Lack of communication is uncomfortable

By Sean Jensen
Updated: July 18, 2009

Cris Carter

Cris Carter

ST. PAUL, Mn. — Whether or not Brett Favre signs with the Vikings — and Cris Carter assumes he will — the team could face fallout from within, according to the former Vikings receiver.

In the Twin Cities to work with Minneapolis native Larry Fitzgerald and other NFL receivers, Carter said this isn’t easy for the two quarterbacks waiting until the last minute to become Favre’s backups or the team’s primary options.

Brad Childress had designated Tarvaris Jackson and Sage Rosenfels to compete for the starting job earlier in the offseason, and the Vikings coach eventually will have to deal with them.

“The bad thing is, what is the backlash from no communication with the other kids? Because, ultimately, you have to tell these kids something,” Carter said.

“You’re setting yourself up where they’re going to have a very uncomfortable time, at the first day of camp, because Tarvaris don’t know nothing, and Sage don’t know nothing.

“That right there will be the hurdle for them to overcome, internally.”

Carter said other veterans might need to be handled sensitively, as well, because the drama played out so long with so much uncertainty.

“They’re tired of watching ESPN and finding out what’s happening with their team,” said Carter, referring to the network that employs him as an NFL analyst.

Carter expects Favre to end up with the Vikings.

“I know what one plus one equals. I played a long time, and I trained almost exclusively away from here,” said Carter, a Viking for 12 of his 16 NFL seasons.

“They never sent Chuck (Barta) and (Fred) Zamberletti to see me,” Carter said, referring to the trainers during his Vikings tenure. “I would only be sending my employees to work with employees.”

Carter was referring to reported visits by Viking officials to Hattiesburg, Miss., to check on Favre’s surgically repaired throwing arm. On Tuesday, Favre told the Associated Press in Hattiesburg that he would have an answer for the Vikings by the July 30 reporting deadline for training camp.

Carter doesn’t see the timing as an issue for Favre and expects the quarterback to improve an offense ranked 17th last season.

“If I’m running the Vikings, I’m looking at every position and seeing how I might get better at every position. Forget all the other mess,” Carter said, referring to Favre’s long tenure with the Green Bay Packers. “I know he’s better (than the current quarterbacks).

“He can make (the Vikings) dangerous.”

Carter called Pro Bowl running back Adrian Peterson the “most dominant non-quarterback in the league,” who demands the opposition to put eight defenders in the box.

“With Brett, what kind of cover you going to play against them?” Carter said. “He opens it up. And Brett opens up their offense for Brad. Brad will do things that he has never done, because of Brett.”

Carter said 2008 might not be the best barometer of Favre’s abilities because the quarterback waited until late in the offseason to decide not to retire, then the Packers traded him to the New York Jets during training camp and he had a limited time to learn a new offense.

“He went from spending all of his life in the United States to all of a sudden speaking Chinese when he went to a different system,” Carter said. “(The Jets) couldn’t run their whole offense.”

Carter said the adjustment to the Vikings would be much easier for Favre, who ran a similar West Coast offense with Green Bay.