BOMB SHELL EDITORIAL NCAA ‘SCAM’ UNDER NEW ATTACK

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Updated: October 13, 2006

BOMB SHELL EDITORIAL NCAA ‘SCAM’ UNDER NEW ATTACK

READ ALL ABOUT IT

The Wall Street Journal

the most read newspaper

on the Planet Earth

it not normally known

for the Quality of

it’s Editorials

Not the case on Friday when it led off its so called Weekend Edition editorial page with the following headline ” WHO PROFITS FROM COLLEGE SPORTS ” following by a Blistering 8 paragraph attack on the Money Trail in NCAA Sports focusing in on a new probe underway in Congress.

The editorial highlights some points anyone with at least half a brain (our readers of course have Full Brains and then some) sort of know but don’t necessarily think about. Most of all the tax FREE nature of all those Billions NCAA colleges raise and even the tax FREE status of so many of the bucks Corporate America throws at NCAA football and basketball all of this under the COVER that the colleges are Not For Profit organizations who us the money to do Good.

CON GAME

Billion Dollar

CON GAME

We aren’t going to try to Re-invent the Wheel today as we do so well so often in the Box. Today we will give credit where it is due simply and extensively quoting this POWERFUL editorial in the Wall Street Journal.

Let the Quotes begin …..

” Writing on Oct. 2 to NCAA President Myles Brand, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Bill Thomas (R., Calif.) asked enough probing questions to keep Mr. Brand and his university associates busy for ages. They must now scramble to prove that their underlying mission is educational in nature — the basis on which college-sports revenue traditionally has been sheltered from the taxman. For the average reader, however, the letter contains some bombshells that could make it difficult to have much sympathy for the NCAA and its member schools during their current ordeal under the congressional microscope.”

Next paragraph please …..

” The grilling is already pretty intense. Rep. Thomas notes that under the terms of the NCAA’s deal with CBS for broadcast rights to the men’s basketball tournament, the organization is set to earn a yearly average of $545 million in tax-free money. Then he asks: “How does the transformation of the NCAA men’s basketball championship into commercialized entertainment further the educational purpose of the NCAA and its member institutions? ”

There’s lots more …

” Rep. Thomas also brings up the favorable tax treatment that corporations and others can get in return for “sponsorship payments.” Then there’s the $100 million that the NCAA doles out each year among Division I championship basketball teams. What’s the educational purpose of all that? ”

” More to the point, as the letter asks: “From the standpoint of a Federal taxpayer, what benefits does the NCAA provide taxpayers in exchange for its tax exemption? ”

Keep going …..

” Also in the torrent of questions are zingers like this: “Why should the Federal government subsidize the athletic activities of educational institutions when that subsidy is being used to help pay for escalating coaches’ salaries, costly chartered travel and state-of-the art athletic facilities?” And what about NCAA reports showing that public universities spent as much as $600,000 per men’s basketball player during the 2004-05 school year: “How [does that] further the educational mission of universities?” Congress also wants to know: “What percentage of NCAA revenue is spent by your member institutions on solely academic matters?” And so on. ?

Nearing the end …..

” The letter zeroes in on some familiar criticisms for the NCAA, such as low-graduation rates among athletes — only 55% for football players at Division I-A schools, Rep. Thomas writes, and 38% for basketball, compared with 64% for all students. In his reply, Mr. Brand undoubtedly will cite some signs of improvement, particularly with regard to graduation rates among black athletes — the students most often victims of schools that want their players’ touchdowns and baskets without having to give them an education. ”

Finally this RIDICULOUS retort from the NCAA

” A general, initial response to the congressional letter came from NCAA spokesman Erik Christianson. “We simply disagree with the fundamental assertion that intercollegiate athletics is not part of higher education,” he told the Chronicle of Higher Education this week. Let’s hope Mr. Brand doesn’t try to rest his case on that bland assertion. In a battle like this one, the NCAA will need a large and powerful roster of convincing details to prevail.”

All Hail the Journal

For joining the Battle

against

THE CON GAME

known as the

NCAA

Whenever you want to reach us with comments or better yet an idea for a topic for the Box ……. blackbox@blackathlete.net

NCAA’S LEAD CON ARTIST MYLES BRAND ” OUR ONLY PURPOSE IS TO EDUCATE STUDENTS “